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Welsh-Rarebit Yorkshire Pudding

Welsh-Rarebit Yorkshire Pudding

In my twenty-something years of living, I'm not sure I've ever had Yorkshire pudding outside of my own kitchenette in New York, stooped over a battered Nigella Lawson cookbook, whisk in hand, squinting through my reading glasses to make out the insensible metric measurements of those other people. I have been to London, however, but even there, I'd have to break into someone's house to eat this. Proper home food, Ms. Lawson would call it—and thus, to me, a stolen treat. My version takes the original recipe (egg, milk, flour) and "turduckens" it into another British delicacy: Welsh rarebit. We Americans have no idea what any of this means (why is it called "pudding"?)—but it's good with meats and gravies, or as a savory snack for one.^

1 tablespoon vegetable oil or beef drippings
1 egg
1/4 cup milk
1/4 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon English mustard powder
1/4 teaspoon herbes de Provence
1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
Pinch salt
Freshly cracked black pepper
1 tablespoon grated sharp Cheddar

Brush a single ramekin with the tablespoon of oil or fat (being unafraid to leave behind grease, at the bottom especially). Place on a baking sheet and transfer to the oven, which should then be set to 450 degrees F. (As the oven preheats, the fat will get necessarily hot.)

In a bowl, whisk together the egg, milk, flour, mustard, herbes, Worcestershire, salt, pepper, and Cheddar. Let this mixture rest for 10 minutes (because for some reason you're supposed to), or until the oven is nice and hot. Carefully pour the batter straight into the ramekin and bake for 20 minutes. (Do NOT peek.)

Eat straight away with a light dribble of honey and cream, or serve with a single's roast in place of the potatoes.

^This recipe can be doubled, tripled, quadrupled, quintupled.

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